Category: Issue 6

Pascale Petit awarded the 2018 RSL Ondaatje Prize for "Mama Amazonica"


Pascale Petit has been awarded the 2018 RSL Ondaatje Prize for Mama Amazonica (Bloodaxe Books). This is the first time poetry has won the Prize. Please read the RSL Ondaatje – Winner Press Release 2018 for more information.
Pascale Petit responds:
“I’m absolutely thrilled to win this particular prize for a book evoking the spirit of a place. I’ve been obsessed with the Amazon rainforest for 25 years, and I poured that obsession into Mama Amazonica. The Amazon has become my mother, in all her abused glory, and through that eco-system I am able to love an estranged and mentally ill parent. I’ve travelled to the Amazon four times, and recently stayed in a research centre deep in the Peruvian pristine jungle, and have observed at close hand how scientists are recording species as they vanish. It was there I saw a jaguar in his home!”
Read Pascale Petit‘s interview in Interlitq.
UK poet, Pascale Petit‘s Wikipedia entry.
UK poet Pascale Petit‘s website.
Read Pascale Petit‘s contribution to Interlitq‘s Poetic Voices.
Read Pascale Petit‘s contribution to Issue 6 of Interlitq.

Pascale Petit is "much happier in the deep country…, surrounded by birds and lush greenery"

Pascale Petit. Photo credit: Derek Adams

Pascale Petit interviewed by Interlitq: read the entire interview.
Interlitq: Now that you are based in Cornwall, do you miss Walthamstow?
Pascale Petit: No I don’t. I had been trying to get away from London for years, and am much happier in the deep country here, surrounded by birds and lush greenery, and our own wild river 100 yards downhill from our house, the Lynher, which roars down from Bodmin Moor.
UK poet, Pascale Petit‘s Wikipedia entry.
UK poet Pascale Petit‘s website.
Read Pascale Petit‘s contribution to Interlitq‘s Poetic Voices.
Read Pascale Petit‘s contribution to Issue 6 of Interlitq.
 
 

Rita Dove terms Stanley Plumly “the successor to James Wright and John Keats”

Stanley Plumly will receive the award on the UI campus this fall. Photo courtesy Stanley Plumly.
Stanley Plumly will receive the award on the UI campus this fall. Photo courtesy Stanley Plumly.

Rita Dove, the U.S. poet who is a Consulting Editor for Interlitq, and a contributor to Issue 6 of Interlitq, terms Stanley Plumly, the recipient of this year´s Truman Capote Award, “the successor to James Wright and John Keats”:

The Immortal Evening: A Legendary Dinner With Keats, Wordsworth, and Lamb, written by Stanley Plumly, Distinguished University Professor and Director of Creative Writing at the University of Maryland and winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Paterson Poetry Prize, is the winner of the 2015 Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism in Memory of Newton Arvin.

The $30,000 award—the largest annual cash prize in English-language literary criticism—is administered for the Truman Capote Estate by the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Plumly will accept the award on Oct. 29, 2015, in a public event at the UI that will include remarks on the literary topic of his choosing. Called “the successor to James Wright and John Keats” by the poet Rita Dove, Plumly is a poet and nonfiction writer whose works include biography and literary criticism. Plumly, author of the highly acclaimedPosthumuous Keats, is also the Poet Laureate of the state of Maryland.

The book was chosen by an international panel of prominent critics and writers—Terry Castle, Garrett Stewart, Michael Wood, John Kerrigan, Elaine Scarry, and Joyce Carol Oates—each of whom nominated two books. Books of general literary criticism in English, published during the last four years, are eligible for nomination. After reading all the nominated books, each critic ranked the nominees.