Category: Ireland

The exit polls say Ireland has voted to legalize abortion with a large majority

An Aer Lingus flight attendant walks past a new mural of Savita Halappanavar in Dublin on Friday, the day of a referendum on liberalizing Ireland’s abortion laws. Halappanavar’s death after a miscarriage helped spur the referendum. (Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters)

Henry Farrell writes:
An Irish Times exit poll says Ireland has voted to repeal the constitutional provision banning abortion with a crushing majority. The poll says that 68 percent voted yes and 32 percent voted against. People on both sides had expected a yes vote over the past couple of days; few had expected that the margin would be so decisive. Of course, the exit poll may be wrong, but it is hard to imagine that it could be wrong enough to call the final result into question.

"…patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis's efforts"

Brian Inglis
Brian Inglis (1916-1993) was neither the first nor only author to question blind obedience to doctors. Nonetheless, his controversial classic “Fringe Medicine” (1964, Faber and Faber) ushered in the modern era of patient advocacy, laying the foundations for today’s wellness movement. The author’s traversal of this field laid out options for desperate patients ill-served by conventional therapies and determined to recapture their health. How well has Inglis’s campaign withstood the test of time?
Inglis’s warnings of antibiotic resistance are remarkably prescient. In other areas he may have gone too far (the “black box,” used in the technique of radiesthesia, has faded from view). Self-censorship was never Brian’s forte, and his polemics unleashed a counter-revolution with the rise of the global skeptical movement in the 1970s.
The fact remains that patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis’s efforts. Join us at interlitq.org as Brian’s son Neil Langdon Inglis reviews “Fringe Medicine,” soon to be re-released by Endeavour Media in an e-book edition.

Neil Langdon Inglis, Interlitq's U.S. Editor, to review Brian Inglis's book, "Fringe Medicine"

Brian Inglis
Brian Inglis (1916-1993) was neither the first nor only author to question blind obedience to doctors. Nonetheless, his controversial classic “Fringe Medicine” (1964, Faber and Faber) ushered in the modern era of patient advocacy, laying the foundations for today’s wellness movement. The author’s traversal of this field laid out options for desperate patients ill-served by conventional therapies and determined to recapture their health. How well has Inglis’s campaign withstood the test of time?
Inglis’s warnings of antibiotic resistance are remarkably prescient. In other areas he may have gone too far (the “black box,” used in the technique of radiesthesia, has faded from view). Self-censorship was never Brian’s forte, and his polemics unleashed a counter-revolution with the rise of the global skeptical movement in the 1970s.
The fact remains that patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis’s efforts. Join us at interlitq.org as Brian’s son Neil Langdon Inglis reviews “Fringe Medicine,” soon to be re-released by Endeavour Media in an e-book edition.
Read more about Neil Langdon Inglis
Read more about Brian Inglis