Category: History

Interlitq to publish Neil Langdon Inglis’s review of Brian Inglis’s book, “Abdication”

Neil Langdon Inglis

In his review of his father Brian Inglis‘s account of King Edward VIII’s withdrawal from the throne (“Abdication,” pubs. Macmillan, 1966), Neil Langdon Inglis, Interlitq‘s U.S. Editor, must confront a crucial question regarding his father’s motivations as a historian. How did such a keen critic of the British Empire come to write such an objective, fair, and joyfully entertaining treatment of the doomed monarch and his chequered married life? Neil Langdon Inglis‘s inquiries begin at the National Science and Media Museum in Bradford, England, which he visited ten years ago in order to view the two episodes of Brian Inglis‘s 1960s television show “All Our Yesterdays” which the museum had in its vaults. Join us as Neil Langdon Inglis solves this literary puzzle in an Interlitq exclusive. And watch out for the forthcoming electronic edition of Abdication, soon to be released by Endeavour Media.

About Brian Inglis

About Neil Langdon Inglis

March 2018: Interlitq to publish Neil Langdon Inglis's review ("Revolutionary or traitor?") of his father&#...

 
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Hanged for treason in the depths of WWI, Roger Casement (1864-1916) remains a heroic figure for many in his home country of Ireland. When Irish author Brian Inglis turned his attention to the enigmatic revolutionary executed in the year of Inglis’s birth, a sympathetic treatment of the subject seemed likely. And yet, it bears witness to Inglis’s judicious objectivity that his resulting biography of Casement yielded no whitewash, but a measured assessment of a man of ideals and fatal flaws. With the release of a new Kindle edition by Endeavour Media, a new generation of readers can now savor Inglis’s account of Casement’s life, a true classic of the genre (first published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1973). In March 2018, Brian’s son Neil Langdon Inglis (Interlitq‘s U.S. General Editor) will review his father’s biography in his article “Revolutionary or traitor?”.
Read more about Roger Casement
Read more about Neil Langdon Inglis