Category: Fiction

Keeping Up, a story by Dilys Rose

14/05/2021
Edinburgh, Scotland

Fiction by Dilys Rose

 

Keeping Up

Cilla is dreaming of a pirate, of the swashbuckling, buccaneer variety—roguishly handsome, with a luxuriant beard and glinting earring but none of the stink and ingrained filth that are part and parcel of the trade. No eyepatch or knotted headscarf but he is brandishing some kind of bladed weapon, a cutlass, surely—isn’t that what old-school pirates ran with? He is a distance away and yet somehow close enough to smell pipe tobacco and seadog rum on his breath. She hears herself murmuring ‘sea-green eyes’ when Frankie’s querulous voice barges into her dream and dispatches the brigand.

Cilla. Cilla! We’re anchoring in ten. If you don’t get a move on, we’ll have to wait for ever!

If they’re anchoring in ten, they’re already too late. Everyone wants a place on the first batch of tenders, and queues for the escalators will already be dozens deep. Cilla rolls over on her bunk and peers through the porthole of their shared cabin. In the distance, squat, blocky buildings line the quay against a backdrop of parched scrub. At least they won’t be spending their shore day there.

She’d only meant to close her eyes while Frankie wrapped up her morning flirt with the waiters, not to actually nod off. Cilla blames the food. There is always so much on offer, and quality food at that. The kitchens work round the clock to turn out ever-more tempting dishes and the aroma of freshly baked bread infiltrates the ventilation system at all hours. Though Cilla always sticks to the Light Continental Option, even on a shore day when everyone stocks up on breakfast, the waistband of her favourite holiday trousers is already beginning to pinch. Frankie, damn her, can tuck into a Full English every day without any change to her coat-hanger frame.

After being marshalled by bumptious, semaphoring stewards onto a packed escalator descending to the lower decks, the two tramp the gangway to their allotted tender where, by means of some sly elbowing, they secure a spot from which to view their approach to The Jewel of the Eastern Mediterranean. More queuing and more gangways before Cilla and Frankie, lurching after several days at sea, join the hordes pouring through the archways of the Old Port and onto the paved, mediaeval streets.

The journey from the deck of their cruise ship to Dubrovnik—a distance of no more than a few kilometres—has taken the best part of the morning. Preparations for lunch are underway and the city reeks of grilling meat and fish. Their first stop: queuing at the ATM for local currency; their second: queuing at the adequate but overpriced public toilets; their third: securing a bench in the shade so Frankie can apply sunblock.

You could always cover your arms, says Cilla.

I could, says Frankie, but I don’t want to.

As ever, Cilla has dressed for comfort and concealment. As ever, Frankie has opted for style: a sleeveless white dress with a gold border at the neck and hem, strappy gold sandals and matching toenail polish. Her colour coordination is marred by blazing epaulettes of sunburn, from lounging too long on the lido the previous afternoon, ogling the ship’s all-male dance troupe as they leapt and flexed, rehearsing for the final night’s extravaganza.

There’d better not be loads of stairs, says Frankie, squinting through a gold-trimmed visor at a slice of ancient wall, glimpsed between rooftops.

Frankie finds stairs difficult. If they’d booked a city tour, a workaround for those with mobility issues would have been on offer but Frankie prefers to soldier on and kid everybody— including herself— that she’s still in her prime.

We don’t have to do it, says Cilla.

What’s the point in coming at all if you don’t do the main sights? Who goes to Paris and doesn’t do the Eiffel Tower?

I’ve never done the Eiffel Tower.

But that’s just you, Cilla, trying to be different. Cilla went to Paris and didn’t do the Eiffel Tower. Cilla went to New York and didn’t visit the Statue of Liberty. Cilla went to Agra and didn’t see the Taj Mahal

I did see the Taj Mahal. I sent you a postcard.

Did you? Nobody bothers with postcards any more. Must have been a while ago.

It was. Cameron and I were on our honeymoon.

Oh, Cameron, says Frankie. Ancient history, then.

Not to me it isn’t!

Cilla takes slow, deep breaths while Frankie bats her eyes at a bronzed hunk, smoking in a coffee shop doorway, and resolutely ignoring her. She has never married and considers Cilla’s twenty-five-year marriage and ensuing decade of chaste widowhood a huge yawn. Though Frankie’s own life—if her version of events is to be believed—has been awash with steamy and/or stormy affairs, she shows little sign of abandoning hope that Prince Charming may still rock up and sail her off into an incomparable sunset.

The two women have been friends for fifty years. Not always the very best of friends but, despite jags of rage and corrosive irritations borne of long familiarity, their lives now peg along on similarly solitary lines. Since Cilla became a widow, they’ve taken their annual holiday together. They’ve done self-catering cabins, budget packages, city breaks and bus tours but as this is something of a watershed year, they’ve splashed out on a cruise. It’s a pity, they agree, that their budget hadn’t stretched to single cabins.

I so want to do the wall, says Frankie. If only my stupid feet are up to it.

Perhaps we need a Plan B, says Cilla, leafing through her guide book. The cathedral has paintings by Dalmatian and Italian artists, including one by Raphael.

If they only mention one Raphael, nothing else will be worth bothering with.

The reliquary contains the head and a leg of a thirteenth-century saint.

Who wants to see creepy old body parts?

The maritime museum hosts a fine collection of seahorses.

Fun for five minutes, says Frankie. Which way to the wall?

Cilla indicates the slow procession of crumpled shorts, bulging bum bags and floppy hats: no longer an invading horde but a vast herd of docile cattle, plodding across flagstones buffed to a sheen by centuries of feet and hooves. The streets are so congested it’s hard to appreciate the mix of Gothic, Baroque and Renaissance architecture the city is renowned for. In the main square, in front of an ornate town hall, a band of men in white shirts, black trousers and crimson cummerbunds sing in doleful unison to a loose horseshoe of audience.

Klapa, says Cilla. They sing about tragedies at sea, lost love and such.

Oh, let’s not stop for the doom and gloom, says Frankie. They’ll be passing round the hat in a minute and we don’t have any coins.

As soon as they pass through the ticket booth and begin to climb the first flight of steep, uneven stairs, the heat hits them. Frankie, who insisted on leading the way so she didn’t have to play catchup, gasps at every step. Cilla’s heart begins to thump assertively.  She, too, must pace herself. She presses against the sun-baked stone to let a group of nimble Japanese matrons squeeze past. Oblivious to the tailback, Frankie continues upwards. Perhaps she doesn’t hear their gentle twittering. Frankie is quite deaf but refuses to admit it.

When they reach the ramparts, the Japanese group patter past Frankie. Cilla catches her breath, takes in the shimmering expanse of sea.  Frankie, groaning, massages her ankles.

Couldn’t they have got us here before it was so hot?

What a view! says Cilla.

The colour of the sea’s a bit wishy-washy, says Frankie, standing on tiptoe so she can see over the perimeter wall. Reminds me of that mouthwash of yours. By the way, I used some this morning but I don’t care for the taste.

Bring your own, then.

Surely, Cilla, you don’t begrudge me a capful of mouthwash?

That’s not the point.

The point is that Frankie crams every beauty product imaginable into her toilet bag but forgets some essential item, like soap or toothpaste. Always.

The sky is unbroken blue. It is almost noon and fiercely hot, with only the thinnest slivers of shade. Encrusted with tourists, diamond-shaped ramparts encompass domes, steeples and pitched roofs and the seaward sections extend over sheer cliffs. The walls were built in the thirteenth century to protect the city from invasion, Cilla reads. In the fifteenth century, numerous towers were built upon them; some are still standing. There’s one! she says, gesturing to where the Japanese women are arranging themselves for group photos, their laughter dipping and darting like bright birds.

Spare me the history lesson, says Frankie. My God, look at all those stairs!

We don’t have to go all the way round.

But if we don’t go all the way round, we haven’t really done it, have we?

Does it matter? says Cilla.

It matters to me, says Frankie.

The taverna where Frankie insists they have lunch—persuaded by the moustachioed hunk touting for trade at the entrance—is packed but does have terrace seating beneath a vine-laden trellis.

I never want to see that wall again, says Frankie.

But we did it! says Cilla. And you have to admit the views were sensational.

My feet are killing me.

Shall we treat ourselves to wine?

If you say so, says Frankie, though God knows what the local stuff is like.

They have Italian wines as well.

No, no, says Frankie. When in Dubrovnik—

When the waiter—yet another Adonis—arrives, Frankie quizzes him about the wine list, only to settle, eventually, on a carafe of house white. Having read that sharing plates are the norm, Cilla enquires about portion size but, despite his eloquence on the wine list, the waiter is vague.  Not that it matters. Frankie has set her heart on the local speciality—squid ink risotto—and so Cilla, who’s allergic to seafood, has no alternative but to order something else.

This is just another tourist trap, says Frankie. Do you see any locals eating here? It can’t possibly be authentic.

You chose it.

We were hungry, Cilla. We had to eat somewhere. I’d just have liked to eat somewhere authentic.

Do you think they’d have such hot waiters in an authentic place? Or linen tablecloths, traditional music? If you want the real deal, the guide book says, expect a surly proprietor, Formica tables and blaring MTV.

You’re such a smart-arse, says Frankie. And I bet that guide book is way out of date.

Like us, says Cilla.

Speak for yourself, says Frankie. I keep up, Cilla. I keep up.

The wine arrives promptly, the food tardily. Thirsty from so much walking in the heat, both women drink deep.

I don’t know why you have to bang on about portion size, says Frankie. Anyone can see you don’t exactly starve yourself.

You eat as much as I do, says Cilla. A lot more, in fact.

Maybe, Frankie preens, but I can get away with it.

Do you have to be such a bitch?

I just tell it like it is, Cilla.

Well, don’t bother. I know how it is.

The wine has gone to their heads. They are talking too loudly. Not that it matters; everybody is jawing away and drowning out the weeping strings. The food eventually arrives and the portions are enormous. Frankie wrinkles her nose at the purplish-brown mound on her plate, samples a forkful suspiciously and, loudly enough for half the terrace to hear, pronounces it revolting. She summons the waiter—there really is no need for the finger-snapping—and tells him to take it away.

You want something else?

No, dear, she says, stroking the waiter’s smooth, golden forearm with a mottled claw. My friend doesn’t like big portions. We can share her dish—can’t we, Cilla?

With a shrug, the waiter departs, skinny hips snaking between closely packed tables, Frankie’s rejected plate of squid ink risotto held aloft.

By the time they have polished off Cilla’s more-than-ample chicken salad, drained the carafe of wine and paid the bill, the terrace is all but deserted.

We’re running a bit late, says Cilla.

Just a quick look?

We’ll have to be quick.

Tipsily, they veer off the main drag and plunge into a web of backstreets, only to find the gift shop shutters drawn, their doors and grilles bolted. The only sign of life is a slit-eyed cat, basking on a dusty windowsill.

I thought you said they don’t do siesta here, says Frankie.

They don’t. Maybe it’s some kind of local holiday.

So, we’re not going to get any souvenirs? I promised my yoga teacher I’d bring her some lavender oil.

She’ll cope, says Cilla, opening up her map.  I don’t think we’re going the right way. We have to work out where we are, and which direction we’re facing, before we go any further.

But we can’t be late back! says Frankie, a rattle of panic in her voice. The tenders won’t wait. No exceptions, they said. No exceptions!

I’m trying, says Cilla, to prevent us being late. We could have asked a shopkeeper for directions but as you can see there aren’t any shopkeepers to ask.

That’s a fat lot of use, then! says Frankie. But I wouldn’t trust a local, to be honest. Remember that bus driver on Crete?

It was Corfu.

Same difference. That guy screwed us around on purpose, says Frankie. Bastard. I bet he bragged about it to his pals in the Ouzo bars.

I’m sure he had better stories to tell, says Cilla.

At the end of their week in Corfu, which until then had been remarkably hitch-free, they’d decided to save on the shuttle and take a municipal bus to the airport. The guide book had made it seem straightforward enough but despite asking the driver to let them know when to get off, the bus clattered past the airport and was miles down the road before they realised. They had no choice but to lug their suitcases off the bus, drag them across the road and wait, amid maize fields teeming with locusts, for a bus from the opposite direction to return them to the airport.  It was quite a wait. They only just made their flight.

Come on, Cilla. We don’t have time to stand around while you ponder that map.

We don’t have time to take a wrong turning.

Oh, for God’s sake! I told you we should get somebody to put Google Maps on our phones.

But we don’t know how to use the App, says Cilla. And you said it was more trouble than it was worth. You said you’d rather rely on common sense—

I don’t remember saying anything of the kind, says Frankie, but we really must get up to speed on technology if we’re to survive in the modern world. I mean, you can’t even operate a self-service checkout, can you, Cilla? You need somebody to help you buy a loaf of bread! You should have asked that boy of yours to set us up with Google Maps. You’re always banging on about what a whiz he is with techy stuff. What’s the point in having children if they can’t help out when you need them to?

They are standing at a fork in the road. Cilla folds her arms. Frankie digs her knuckles into bony hips. Their mismatched shadows—one short and skinny, the other tall and stout—are cast across the intersection, like Laurel and Hardy squaring up for a scrap.

If we’re late, they’ll go without us! Frankie bleats. They’ll hand over our passports to the ship’s agent and we’ll be left high and dry!

Could be worse, says Cilla, at least we have our credit cards.  But the thought of missing the boat, of having to negotiate repatriation with Frankie and she’s breaking out in sweat. Her chest tightens.  A glittering confetti fills her field of vision. Is it the wine? Is she having a panic attack, a stroke? She takes slow, deep breaths, blocks out Frankie’s bleating and concentrates on a plain, dark door until the confetti begins to evaporate and her pulse rate subsides.

Cilla has never been great at map-reading and the print is so tiny it’s barely legible, even with her new glasses. The sun bites into the back of her neck as she compares the branching backstreets with the street plan.

Maybe Frankie is right: if they’d had Google Maps, a mechanical voice would be issuing instructions on which way to turn and how long it would take to reach their destination. Hot, tired, footsore and not a little anxious, they might have found the default voice annoying but they could have relinquished responsibility and tottered on, trustingly, without making decisions, or bickering, or having to think.

Okay! she says, I’ve got it. It’s this way.

Are you sure? How can you be sure?

If we leg it, we should get there in time. Just.

Can’t we just take a taxi?

We’re in a pedestrian precinct, Frankie. Do you see any taxis? The whole city centre’s a pedestrian precinct.

But I’m so tired! My head hurts. And my feet! My poor, stupid feet—

Just one push, Frankie, says Cilla. It can’t be far.

Cilla hopes that she will never again find herself at this crossroads: its crooked sheaf of street signs, its closed doors and shuttered windows, its pitted mediaeval walls and time-smoothed paving stones. Determination battling with desperation, she sets off; every so often she glances over her shoulder to check that Frankie, her friend of fifty years, is keeping up.

 

About Dilys Rose

Dilys Rose lives in Edinburgh, and is a novelist, short story writer and poet. She has published eight books of fiction and four of poetry, most recently the novel Unspeakable (Freight, 2017), set in seventeenth-century Edinburgh. Her poetry pamphlet, Stone the Crows (Mariscat Press), was published in 2020. A fifth collection of stories is due out in 2022. She divides her time between Edinburgh and a small studio on the East Lothian coast, where, throughout the pandemic, she has been writing and making collages.

 

 

Piano à Lamotte, par Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix

Piano à Lamotte

Le soir ombrait le crépi de la façade du château. Une balustre du toit de l’aile droite attestait encore la présence du soleil, beige et gris devenus roses. Moment éphémère qui rehaussait le ciel du crépuscule. Le silence comme un voile sur l’assistance.

Quelques phares éclairaient le grand’ queue ouvert, les murs, les volets gris ; sur la terrasse, à gauche, une estrade : le piano noir. Devant, un mince jeune homme sur un tabouret noir, cheveux et costume noirs.

Le soir.

Chopin.
Un début. Il y eut un début—–Mazurkas et Polonaise—–comme tout commencement. Avec les hésitations, les timidités, les incertitudes ; des ruptures dans le ton, dans le rythme. L’instrument, fatigué d’avoir voyagé, d’avoir tant été accordé l’après-midi. Le si jeune homme troublé par les présences de la demeure, du soir d’été, de l’assemblée, perturbé par ce vide de l’espace ouvert derrière et au-dessus, sans rien.

Puis le soir tissa une sorte de coquille par l’absence progressive de lumière. Des chevaux reniflèrent sans hennir.
Puis Chopin tira le jeune homme vers la mélodie de sa Ballade No.4 en Fa Mineur, lentement l’entoura des notes que ses propres mains détachaient, jetaient, envols de papillons. Un oiseau lança sa trille. Un autre son cri.
Puis le cercle se ferma autour d’un unisson, le piano, le ciel, le pianiste, le crépuscule, la Polonaise Fantaisie, chaque personne, le château, la pelouse, les arbres ……. Absolument unis par cette sonorité mouvante et fluide. Où le temps n’était plus.

x x x

Il y eut un entr’acte.

Les corps encore vibrants contrastaient avec les conversations convenues ; mais chacun semblait en soi, désireux de préserver cet espace secret subitement ensoleillé par la musique, c’était une autre partie d’eux-mêmes qui parlait.

Les amis, entre eux, se taisaient presque.

Il m’apparut soudain que cette assemblée d’automates déambulant sur la pelouse une flûte de champagne à la main masquait une somme d’êtres humains unis ailleurs, souvent sans même se connaître, unis à une autre profondeur par les instants magiques qui avaient précédé. Que cette union rare, aucun ne souhaitait la briser afin d’aborder la seconde partie du concert dans cet état subtil où le cœur est ouvert à la mystérieuse transcendance. Qu’une impatience, déjà, faisait frissonner les épaules avec la nuit qui venait.

x x x

Avant même la première note de ce Prélude, tout était un à nouveau. Un frémissement fit trembler le cercle, chacun sut intimement que les frontières étaient abolies.

Cette première note fut. Depuis l’origine. Comme si elle provenait de chaque cellule, de chaque élément qui intégrait le cercle et plus vaste encore le monde, l’univers.

Une seule première note. Un infini d’une fraction d’instant qui transporte la chair, traverse les os, irradie les nerfs, galope sur la peau.

Déjà une nuée d’ailes voletaient, les sons rattrapaient les mains véloces du jeune homme mince, un flux continu coulait du clavier aux cordes aux sonorités, enveloppait ce qui restait de densité aux êtres et aux choses, effaçait les contours.

Flux et reflux. Piano liquide. Vagues de la mer et ruisselets d’argent, grondements des torrents, tempêtes rugissantes, rivières de printemps, pâles miroirs des lacs sous la lune, l’eau : verte et bleue, noire ou claire, blanche et grise.

Les hautes branches des platanes centenaires de Lamotte bruirent sous la brise.

La mélodie reprit.

x x x

La musique développait un paysage très vert, de vergers d’abord, parsemés de lumières et d’ombres, en fleurs, puis de sous-bois ocellés de soleil à la manière de Renoir. D’un coup une violence d’orage de montagne déchira l’air comme un fauve déchaîné. Douleur. Les éclairs derrière les yeux aveuglaient la pensée, le tonnerre grondait dans la colonne vertébrale……

Vint la douceur d’une brise estivale, des effluves légers de prairie, d’églantines et de fleurs des champs.
Là se glissait une danse, légère, subreptice, délicate, une danse d’ange. Le son des pas, le pas des sons effleure les sens, caresse l’air : on tremble comme un frisson, les notes ont la couleur pastel des lumières poudrées de l’hiver sur le miroir des étangs.

Alors que le ciel voilé peu à peu coule en soi, tout à coup tinte la note claire d’une cloche dans le lointain. Un son vif qui se répète et se poursuit, change, monte, grimpe ce sentier de montagne, escalade ces rochers, court le long des falaises. Un son comme un bouquetin bondissant, allègre et malicieux, ivre d’espace pur.

Chopin.

x x x

Il eut comme un éclair en Si-Bémol dans ce troisième Prélude et l’amas de rocs déchiquetés se métamorphosa en brume, l’air devint bleu, le corps si léger…….

Seuls subsistaient les battements à l’intérieur des poignets, le pilon régulier du cœur, le martèlement aux tempes. Les notes se suivaient en virevoltant, détachées, graciles, si fines parfois qu’une angoisse vous inondait, une angoisse de perdre le son, de se trouver au-dessus d’un abîme suspendu à cette seule sonorité qui diminuait inexorablement, qui allait s’éteindre, fanal où résidait toute vie. Et avant que ne vienne la note suivante, où la précédente avait disparu, dans cet intervalle infime d’absence absolue, avait fait irruption la mort, presqu’instantanément abolie.

Ainsi, de Prélude en Prélude, d’angoisse insoutenable en joie insondable, de la corniche des gouffres à la rive de soi-même, de la lisière des abysses à l’orée de son âme, entrait-on peu à peu en apesanteur. Point n’était besoin de balancier pour les funambules que nous étions devenus, immobiles, attentifs à cet équilibre impalpable où semble perdurer l’éternité de l’instant.

Une attention si aigue, si totalement effilée que, sans aucun effort ni que l’on s’en aperçoive, survint l’envol. De là-haut, très haut, le grondement formidable du tremblement de terre de cette fureur musicale, de cette passion dévorante, paraissait se dérouler là-bas, tout en bas, dans un autre monde. Mais non pas, car l’être tremblait, aussitôt emporté vers ces mêmes hauteurs, vers les étoiles de ce soir d’été.

Puis ce fut le silence. Le sourd silence des profondeurs. Plus de battements. L’espace anéanti. L’être dilué. Le temps disparu.

x x x

Applaudissements. Encore et encore. Applaudissements. Le jeune homme mince, ses cheveux noirs sur le front, revint s’asseoir sur le tabouret noir, devant le piano noir.

Apnée. Sonate, « Lune d’Automne sur Lac Calme », Etude. Musique aérienne, dansante, qui ruisselle et scintille.

Apnée qui s’étire, comme le fil de soie intense de cette note ténue, fil du soi annihilé.

Immobile, ineffable, ultime.

Chopin.

Wu Muye.

Lamotte.

Le soir.

 

Biographie de l’auteur

Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix, de mère argentine et de père français, est né en 1942 aux Etats Unis, a vécu une partie de son enfance en Argentine puis en France, principalement à Paris.

A l’adolescence il a été élève de l’école des Roches, collège de Normandie, sous la direction d’André Charlier. Après maths sup et maths spé, études de sciences économiques puis de lettres à lla Sorbonne. Coopérant à l’Université du Nord à Antofagasta, Chili, il entre aux Affaires Etrangères pour occuper divers postes culturels et pédagogiques à Mexico, Barcelone, Beyrouth et Nairobi.

Puis il enseigne deux ans dans un CES de Moulins, Allier, France. Il entre ensuite au Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales à Toulouse dans le cadre du Satellite Spot, chargé à Spot Image du développement commercialpour l’Amérique, puis des relations avec les organisations internationales.

En 1991 il rejoint la Girection Générale des Laboratoires Pierre Fabre à Castres comme responsable des relations internationales du Président. Il réside à Buernos-Aires depuis 1997 où il ouvre un bureau de consultancepour guider des entreprises françaises désireuses de s’implanter au Brésil ou en Argentine. Bureau qu’il fermera début 2002.

Membre de l’Académie des Jeux Floraux de Toulouse depuis 2000, Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix partage son temps aujourd’hui entre la France et l’Argentine où il cultive sa passion pour les chevaux.

Il publie en 2008 son premier roman aux Editions du Rocher, « Le Passeur ». En 2011 « Le Crabe et l’Aube » est édité chez Atlantica qui décide de mettre fin à ses activités le jour même de la publication du récit. Deux autres romans sont achevés : « Quartetti e Sonata a Tre » et « Fortuit », un autre en cours d’écriture et trois en projet. Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix a écrit égalementquelques récits courts sur les voyages, les chevaux, Venise, etc … et des poèmes.

Conférencier à ses heures autour de thèmes divers comme « les bibliothèques », « Gérard de Nerval », « l’Amérique du Sud », « Antoine de Saint Exupéry », il s’interroge sur le destin, le sens des mots et de la parole, la signification du voyage, la création artistique, la juste place de l’homme.

Vers le lac Turkana, au Nord du Kenya, par Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix

Vers le lac Turkana, au Nord du Kenya

Hier, la savane arbustive de la Rift Valley.
Tôt aujourd’hui, la savane pauvre, sèche, clairsemée, direction plein Nord …
Puis rien, le sable, la piste qui file, rectiligne, jusqu’au bord du ciel.

Ensuite : la poussière, le sable, la chaleur, le sable, la poussière. Et la réverbération violente de la lumière crue sur la trace blanche, l’étendue pâle, incandescente.

Rythme régulier du moteur de la jeep qui glisse sur le sol dur, l’air brûlant qui suffoque, que l’on respire, lévres serrées, narines desséchées. Miroitement liquide devant, reflets ondulants sur le désert mouvant, la danse du regard égare la raison. Le cerveau oscille, tout tangue, les repères se sont évanouis.

Arrêt obligé. La vibration de la chaleur nous enrobe, envahit toutes les sensations, submerge la vue, étreint la peau, compresse les tempes, aspire le souffle. Plus aucune ligne horizontale, une brûme de sable et de soleil, d’ardeur dense flotte partout, efface la matérialité palpable, absorbe la réalité du monde et de la pensée.

Au moment exact où notre substance même a semblé se diluer jusqu’à l’absence, où il ne restait plus qu’à crier la folie, qu’à disparaítre dans un silence abyssal, ils sont apparus. Un point sombre d’abord.

Par le travers, sur la gauche, loin. Qui oscille … s’avance en un lent balancement. Suivi d’un autre, et d’un autre, et d’un autre encore. Nombreux. En file indienne. Oscillant.

Ils sont juste devant.
Les éléphants.
Majestueusx, magnifiques, grands, moins grands, jeunes, tout petits.

La plupart tenant par la trompe le queue de celui qui précède. Les récemment nés dans l’ombre portée de leur mère.

Avec le tempo immuable venu du début des temps ils ont imperceptiblement disparu un à un sur la droite. Le mirage a absorbé leurs pieds, leur silhouette a ondulé, la brûme les a peu à peu dissous.

Médusés nous les avons regardés sans pouvoir parler. Une émotion tellurienne nous reliait, unissait les humains, les éléphants, le sable, l’air, le ciel deviné, l’univers pressenti.

_________

Nous avons continué vers le lac Turkana. L’horizon est net. Le désert absolu.
Nu.
Dans la lumière uniforme de l’après-midi l’atmosphère ne tremble plus. À certains endroits le sable est parsemê de pierrailles éparpillées, tantôt grises, tantôt noires, des côtes se sont formées sur le sol dont l’ombre raye l’uniformité, écho de la griffure de nuages minces apparus soudain.

Nous en voyons d’abord un seul. Qui se déplace sans hâte. Sa stature, ses cornes, son port altier impressionnent. L’oryx. La grande antilope des déserts africains à la légendaire endurance, mystérieuse, élégante.

Le mufle blanc, le front et les joues noires, l’œil enserré dans un triangle blanc font penser à un masque vénitien, n’étaient les cornes sombres, droites telles des épées paallèles.

Noirs sont les yeux, le creux des oreilles, la queue, la ligne qui sépare le ventre des flancs, qui court au long de l’échine et partage le poitrail, noire la bande qui entoure les antérieurs. La robe est beige, blanche, grise.

Ils sont six ou sept seulement, calmes, distants, énigmatiques. Puissance et présence. Mais aussi absence : leur attitude relègue l’homme à l’extérieur, intrus, inadapté. J’éprouve alors un sentiment de séparation, une indifférence définitive semble dresser une barrière infranchissable entre les hippotragues et les hommes.

Leur présence inatteignable me renvoie par contraste à l’essence fraternelle des éléphants.

Mystère du désert. Mystère de l’homme.

 

Biographie de l’auteur

Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix, de mère argentine et de père français, est né en 1942 aux Etats Unis, a vécu une partie de son enfance en Argentine puis en France, principalement à Paris.

A l’adolescence il a été élève de l’école des Roches, collège de Normandie, sous la direction d’André Charlier. Après maths sup et maths spé, études de sciences économiques puis de lettres à lla Sorbonne. Coopérant à l’Université du Nord à Antofagasta, Chili, il entre aux Affaires Etrangères pour occuper divers postes culturels et pédagogiques à Mexico, Barcelone, Beyrouth et Nairobi.

Puis il enseigne deux ans dans un CES de Moulins, Allier, France. Il entre ensuite au Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales à Toulouse dans le cadre du Satellite Spot, chargé à Spot Image du développement commercialpour l’Amérique, puis des relations avec les organisations internationales.

En 1991 il rejoint la Girection Générale des Laboratoires Pierre Fabre à Castres comme responsable des relations internationales du Président. Il réside à Buernos-Aires depuis 1997 où il ouvre un bureau de consultancepour guider des entreprises françaises désireuses de s’implanter au Brésil ou en Argentine. Bureau qu’il fermera début 2002.

Membre de l’Académie des Jeux Floraux de Toulouse depuis 2000, Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix partage son temps aujourd’hui entre la France et l’Argentine où il cultive sa passion pour les chevaux.

Il publie en 2008 son premier roman aux Editions du Rocher, « Le Passeur ». En 2011 « Le Crabe et l’Aube » est édité chez Atlantica qui décide de mettre fin à ses activités le jour même de la publication du récit. Deux autres romans sont achevés : « Quartetti e Sonata a Tre » et « Fortuit », un autre en cours d’écriture et trois en projet. Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix a écrit égalementquelques récits courts sur les voyages, les chevaux, Venise, etc … et des poèmes.

Conférencier à ses heures autour de thèmes divers comme « les bibliothèques », « Gérard de Nerval », « l’Amérique du Sud », « Antoine de Saint Exupéry », il s’interroge sur le destin, le sens des mots et de la parole, la signification du voyage, la création artistique, la juste place de l’homme.

 

Il se souvanait, par Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix (extrait du roman Le Crabe et l’Aube)

Il se souvenait…

Lucía était entrée dans l’amphithéâtre à pas aériens, sans bruit. Mais elle ne pouvait passer inaperçue. Une lumière particulière l’environnait, soulignant la grâce de ses gestes. Il s’était levé pour la laisser s’asseoir sur le banc dont il occupait l’extrémité. Elle avait posé son regard sur le sien, sans un mot.

Et subitement Roberto n’avait plus su ni le jour ni pourquoi il était là et encore moins ce que le professeur racontait.

« —Tu comprends, avait-il confié à un de ses amis d’alors, ses yeux noirs m’ont emporté très loin dans la lumière poreuse des légendes d’autrefois.

— Tu es amoureux ? Le coup de foudre ?

— Non, je ne crois pas… je ne sais pas. C’est d’une nature plus qu’humaine, une autre dimension, ça n’est pas normal du tout.

— Tu veux dire que tu as rêvé, qu’elle n’existe pas réellement ?

— Non, non.

— Qu’elle est une extra-terrestre ?

— Idiot ! Non. Étrange, c’est-à-dire inexplicable. Pourtant il n’y a pas la moindre coïncidence là-dedans.

— Mais enfin que s’est-il passé ensuite ? »

Il avait eu beaucoup de difficulté à décrire, quant à expliquer…

Habitée, Lucía était aussi faite de chair et de sang. Son mystère tenait en partie à ce lien entre eux, un lien survenu sans coup férir, immédiat, inscrit depuis l’origine.Ils s’aimèrent.

À l’époque, Lucía était d’une timidité extrême et Roberto n’avait guère confiance en lui. Au point qu’ils prirent peur. Peur de souffrir. Panique devant la force inouïe qui les unissait. Ils ne contrôlaient plus rien et décidèrent alors de ne plus se voir.

Quelques années plus tard, il l’avait retrouvée. Immobile à l’angle du soleil et de l’ombre de la grande allée. L’attendaitelle ? Avant même de la distinguer il avait perçu sa clarté, si belle, si aveuglante.

Avait-il ralenti ou accéléré le pas, s’était-il mis à courir vers elle ? Elle fut dans ses bras.

Une semaine auparavant, il avait épousé Françoise. Le hasard ?

………………………………………………………………………………………………

Roberto se rend-il compte qu’il a mené une double vie ? Qu’il ne peut en vouloir à Françoise ? Pas plus qu’à Lucía ni à lui-même.

Un élan inexorable les avait emportés.

Dans le feu de ce torrent qui les embrasait, le voile opaque du temps se diluait par endroits. Stupéfaits, Roberto et Lucía sûrent alors qu’ils s’aimaient depuis avant et longtemps après, si loin en-deçà et au-delà qu’ils ne pouvaient ni nommer ni concevoir. En eux le temps aboli, l’inconcevable durée tout entière en ce moment présent, l’amour sans limites, sans fin ni commencement, en ce point précis de l’univers où ils se trouvaient enlacés, portés par l’onde incandescente.

Ils se défaisaient et se reconstruisaient à chaque instant. Parlaient le langage des profondeurs, rauque, sourd, strident, les sonorités des mots, des murmures et du silence, avant même le regard, les mains et leurs peaux. Ils se respiraient avec avidité, avec lenteur, se touchaient, s’effleuraient, vent qui lisse la plaine, frise l’eau, siffle et dessine la crête de la dune. Souffle du vent.

Elle, fulgurance, et lui feu solaire, incendiés, à la fois lave et lune, noyés dans l’univers bleu des corps et des songes, engloutis par la nuit.

(extrait du roman Le Crabe et l’Aube)

 

Biographie de l’auteur

Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix, de mère argentine et de père français, est né en 1942 aux Etats Unis, a vécu une partie de son enfance en Argentine puis en France, principalement à Paris.

A l’adolescence il a été élève de l’école des Roches, collège de Normandie, sous la direction d’André Charlier. Après maths sup et maths spé, études de sciences économiques puis de lettres à lla Sorbonne. Coopérant à l’Université du Nord à Antofagasta, Chili, il entre aux Affaires Etrangères pour occuper divers postes culturels et pédagogiques à Mexico, Barcelone, Beyrouth et Nairobi.

Puis il enseigne deux ans dans un CES de Moulins, Allier, France. Il entre ensuite au Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales à Toulouse dans le cadre du Satellite Spot, chargé à Spot Image du développement commercialpour l’Amérique, puis des relations avec les organisations internationales.

En 1991 il rejoint la Girection Générale des Laboratoires Pierre Fabre à Castres comme responsable des relations internationales du Président. Il réside à Buernos-Aires depuis 1997 où il ouvre un bureau de consultancepour guider des entreprises françaises désireuses de s’implanter au Brésil ou en Argentine. Bureau qu’il fermera début 2002.

Membre de l’Académie des Jeux Floraux de Toulouse depuis 2000, Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix partage son temps aujourd’hui entre la France et l’Argentine où il cultive sa passion pour les chevaux.

Il publie en 2008 son premier roman aux Editions du Rocher, « Le Passeur ». En 2011 « Le Crabe et l’Aube » est édité chez Atlantica qui décide de mettre fin à ses activités le jour même de la publication du récit. Deux autres romans sont achevés : « Quartetti e Sonata a Tre » et « Fortuit », un autre en cours d’écriture et trois en projet. Antoine de Lévis Mirepoix a écrit égalementquelques récits courts sur les voyages, les chevaux, Venise, etc … et des poèmes.

Conférencier à ses heures autour de thèmes divers comme « les bibliothèques », « Gérard de Nerval », « l’Amérique du Sud », « Antoine de Saint Exupéry », il s’interroge sur le destin, le sens des mots et de la parole, la signification du voyage, la création artistique, la juste place de l’homme.